Items filtered by date: November 2021

Tuesday, 30 November 2021 00:00

Don’t Ignore Them - Stretch!

The many muscles in the feet and toes are often neglected during a typical workout. But just as any other muscle in the body, they require stretching and strengthening to function properly. This is especially true if you are a runner or involved in other activities that keep you on your feet. Ignoring your feet during warmups and workouts can lead to foot injuries and pain later on, so it is suggested that you stretch your feet three to four times per week. One very simple exercise that you can do is roll a tennis ball under your foot. This helps stretch and relax the muscles on the bottom of your foot. For more information about the benefits of foot stretches, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with one of the podiatrists from Bayshore Podiatry Center. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Being the backbone of the body, the feet carry your entire weight and can easily become overexerted, causing cramps and pain. As with any body part, stretching your feet can serve many benefits. From increasing flexibility to even providing some pain relief, be sure to give your feet a stretch from time to time. This is especially important for athletes or anyone performing aerobic exercises, but anyone experiencing foot pain or is on their feet constantly should also engage in this practice.

Great ways to stretch your feet:

  • Crossing one leg over the others and carefully pull your toes back. Do 10-20 repetitions and repeat the process for each foot
  • Face a wall with your arms out and hands flat against the wall. Step back with one foot and keep it flat on the floor while moving the other leg forward. Lean towards the wall until you feel a stretch. Hold for 30 seconds and perform 10 repetitions for each foot
  • Be sure not to overextend or push your limbs too hard or you could risk pulling or straining your muscle

Individuals who tend to their feet by regular stretching every day should be able to minimize foot pain and prevent new problems from arising.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Tampa, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 23 November 2021 00:00

Understanding Achilles Tendon Injuries

On the back of the ankle, there is a thick band of tissue that connects the calf to the heel bone. This is known as the Achilles tendon. If this tendon becomes inflamed near the heel bone, usually due to overuse, it is known as Achilles tendonitis. Patients who have Achilles tendonitis often experience stiffness in the Achilles area, pain in the back of the heel, and swelling. If left untreated, Achilles tendonitis can cause the tendon to degenerate resulting in Achilles tendinosis. If the fibers in the tendon tear (either partially or completely), it is known as an Achilles tendon rupture, which is one of the most severe injuries that can occur to that area. Patients who have pain or stiffness around their Achilles tendon should have it looked at by a podiatrist who can properly diagnose and treat their condition.        

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact one of the podiatrists of Bayshore Podiatry Center. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Tampa, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Sunday, 21 November 2021 00:00

Do Your Child's Feet Hurt?

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.

Tuesday, 16 November 2021 00:00

Why Heel Spurs Form

Heel Spurs are calcium deposits that form on the bottom of the heel near the arch. This area of the foot is referred to as the plantar fascia. Heel spurs can occur when the heel bone and plantar fascia are exposed to repeated stress. This type of stress can be due to over-stretching the plantar fascia, habitual tearing of the heel bone’s thin lining, and straining ligaments and muscles in the feet. The stress in this area usually also causes plantar fasciitis (an inflammation of the plantar fascia). Because heel spurs are not always painful, and usually occur along with plantar fasciitis, they can often go undetected. Symptomatic heel spurs can create a sharp pain, inflammation and tenderness, and feel warm to the touch. People who are obese, older, or who wear improper footwear, are more at risk of developing heel spurs, as well as those who participate in activities such as running and jumping repeatedly, or who suffer from osteoarthritis. A podiatrist will typically use X-rays to identify and diagnose heel spurs. If you believe you may have heel spurs, make an appointment with a podiatrist for an examination and analysis of your condition.

Heel spurs can be incredibly painful and sometimes may make you unable to participate in physical activities. To get medical care for your heel spurs, contact one of the podiatrists from Bayshore Podiatry Center. Our doctors will do everything possible to treat your condition.

Heels Spurs

Heel spurs are formed by calcium deposits on the back of the foot where the heel is. This can also be caused by small fragments of bone breaking off one section of the foot, attaching onto the back of the foot. Heel spurs can also be bone growth on the back of the foot and may grow in the direction of the arch of the foot.

Older individuals usually suffer from heel spurs and pain sometimes intensifies with age. One of the main condition's spurs are related to is plantar fasciitis.

Pain

The pain associated with spurs is often because of weight placed on the feet. When someone is walking, their entire weight is concentrated on the feet. Bone spurs then have the tendency to affect other bones and tissues around the foot. As the pain continues, the feet will become tender and sensitive over time.

Treatments

There are many ways to treat heel spurs. If one is suffering from heel spurs in conjunction with pain, there are several methods for healing. Medication, surgery, and herbal care are some options.

If you have any questions feel free to contact our office located in Tampa, FL . We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to meet your needs.

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Tuesday, 09 November 2021 00:00

What Is Sever’s Disease?

When children between the ages of 8 and 14 struggle with heel pain, it is often a result of Sever’s disease. This occurs when the bones in the calves grow slightly quicker than the Achilles tendon (which connects the calf muscles to the heel bone). When this happens, the tendon tightens and the bones in the heels become swollen and sore. As the child continues to grow, there is thankfully no long-term damage caused by Sever’s disease. Common signs of Sever’s disease include limping, tenderness in the heel, and swelling in the heel bone, particularly after running and jumping activities. Parents who believe that their child is suffering from Sever’s disease should consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment.    

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see one of the podiatrists from Bayshore Podiatry Center. Our doctors can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Tampa, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

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The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a group of viral infections. When a certain type of HPV attacks skin on the soles of the feet, plantar warts may develop. It is generally believed that children are more likely than adults to develop plantar warts because they are more likely to go barefoot, have broken skin, or come in contact with infected surfaces in locker rooms and on playground equipment, towels, or other surfaces where HPV may be lurking. If you notice thick, callus-like areas on the bottom of your child’s feet, they may have plantar warts. They are typically flat and round and may be grey or brown with a grainy texture and ridged border—all of which helps distinguish them from regular calluses. You may even see a tiny black dot in the center of the wart, which is actually a clotted capillary. Plantar warts are often painful when walking or otherwise applying pressure on the bottom of the foot. If your child is complaining about pain on the sole of their foot or you detect something that looks like a plantar wart, it is best to seek the care of a podiatrist, as these hearty, contagious warts may spread and cluster, and are typically resistant to home remedies.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact one of the podiatrists from Bayshore Podiatry Center. Our doctors will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Tampa, FL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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